Increasing your resilience when goals begin to falter

Wiggins-Hour-Record1-630x432It’s often the case that people give up on a goal way too early. Or perhaps worse, don’t even start for fear of not being successful. This is a real shame because armed with the right strategies and tactics you can dramatically increase your chances of achieving the outcome you want. Here’s three ideas for you to explore:

  • Deliberately writing down the real why you want to achieve something. Often this is the element that people skip over. When enthusiasm is high at the start of working towards a goal it doesn’t feel like a good use of time. As you progress you often find that you’re challenged by the bumps-in-the-road and competing demands for your time. It’s at this point that really understanding your reason why comes to the fore. It will help bring objectivity, rekindle the motivation and help you make better decisions. Go full out with this element. Having something that the goal is contributing to which is bigger can also help.
  • Break things down. Obvious, yet not obvious enough for people to do this on a consistent basis. There are multiple approaches you can take with this. One popular approach is to break a goal down by performance e.g. training for a marathon can be a combination of a range of smaller distance goals. Taking this to the next level you could consider looking at the other demands of the event. Extending the marathon example this might include physical, weight, technique and mental goals.  This will provide a regular feed of activity to monitor your progress. You might like to break things into maintenance and target goals. Often people find the hardest element of this is the thinking and planning. In my experience you’ll significantly increase your percentage chance of success if you invest the time.
  • Involve others. The more publicly you commit to a goal the more likely you are to see things through – it of course doesn’t guarantee success. You’ll likely encounter different types of people as you do this. There are those who will actively support you. There’s also a chance that you’ll come up against the neigh-sayers. You know the sort: “Really, you want to do what?” “Come on, people like you don’t do things like that…”. “What’s the point, how are you going to feel when it doesn’t work out?”. I’m going to be charitable with the last example and give them the benefit-of-the-doubt. Perhaps they genuinely think they have your best interests at heart. However, as Bradley Wiggins proved in 2012, kids from Kilburn can win the Tour de France.
Bradley is about to tackle another big goal as he looks to take on the cycling world hour record. He’s been very open and public about his ambition. Not just to beat the existing distance but to put it beyond the reach of others for years to come. That’s confidence for you. He’ll get quite a lot of his confidence from adopting similar strategies to the examples above. Of course there will also be lots of focus and hard work. We mustn’t forget that bit.

So you’re not Bradley Wiggins and your goal is most probably quite different. Why not go for something you’ve been putting off or thought beyond your reach. Explore these strategies to support you. See what you can achieve in the next 90 days. You never know if you go public you might just inspire other people into action too. We’d love to hear your stories.

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